Teen Talk: “It’s so important to have the right motivation of heart.”

Teen Talk: “It’s so important to have the right motivation of heart.”

Sumika might be a shy high school student, but during her time on Jr. Leadership Task Force, her insights on spiritual growth demonstrated that character and a mature perspective are what count when it comes to learning about being a leader.

Jr. LTF is preliminary program for young adults who may go on to participate in Leadership Task Force, designed by Family Peace Association to provide participants with a unique international experience that develops spiritual growth and lessons on leadership to carry into their families, communities, and nations.

Sumika talks about having a higher perspective during leadership program

During the summer Jr. LTF program, Sumika had the goal to “take on a higher perspective.” Her introverted tendencies once made it difficult to break out of her comfort zone to approach people and share about the service project she would be going on to participate in later that summer in Indonesia. However, she shared how she was able to overcome her challenges saying, “I wanted to have a positive attitude and be motivated by the aspiration to live for the sake of others. I realized that by having humility and gratitude, I could think from a different perspective outside my own. It is so important to have the right motivation of heart.”

As Sumika has expressed, when developing leadership capacities in young people, it is essential to instill values that drive them to come up with solutions that may not primarily benefit themselves, but rather be motivated by a greater good. By thinking of the people she is serving, Sumika could look outside only what made her comfortable and reach a new level of maturity that gave her a glimpse into what she called “God’s perspective.”

Teen Talk: “It is only through challenge that we grow.”

Teen Talk: “It is only through challenge that we grow.”

Piljin is a new high school graduate who participated in a five-day fundraising campaign to pay his way through Family Peace Association’s leadership program for young adults. His story is one of challenge, leadership and maturity that gave him what he called “spiritual strength” to grow as a brother in his family and a leader in his community.

Piljin’s fundraising experience proved to be one of the most challenging and rewarding experiences of his young life. He describes the process of fundraising as a “mental challenge.”

Piljin expresses his gratitude to his family as a high school graduate and participant in Jr. Leadership Task Force

“We talked about challenges throughout the week, but it’s only through challenge that we grow. In one sense, I’d like to believe that overcoming challenge during the fundraising allowed me to see the people and the area I live in from a new perspective.”

Every day in transit between his home and school, Piljin crosses paths with many people, typically without a word. But by fundraising, he was put into a position where he could share why he cared to be a part of a leadership program in the first place.

“When you’re out there, you’re conveying your beliefs to complete strangers. When you’re talking to people you have to explain your beliefs and values. Opportunities like that, bottom line, are good chances to grow. It helps affirm your beliefs, conviction, motivation and faith.”

When it comes to leadership development, character, values and a healthy life of faith are all part of becoming a leader who can use their conviction and determination to help other people.

“Fundraising is definitely a spiritual, internal exercise,” said Piljin. “Through challenges you’re able to learn and grow and figure out where you stand and be honest with yourself.”

Jr. Leadership Task Force offers a summer program, providing middle and high school students the opportunity to participate in a unique experience of spiritual growth and lessons on leadership they can carry into their families, schools and communities.

Jr. Leadership Task Force Indonesia Adventures

Jr. Leadership Task Force Indonesia Adventures

Jr. Leadership Task Force members traveled from the United States and Korea to participate in service projects, leadership development workshops, cultural expeditions and an interfaith assembly in Indonesia.

One thing I realized is that we need to have the perspective of wanting the religions’ harmonization not by letting it be different and just co-existing, but by seeing beyond the identities the religions give to people and recognizing that they are all children of God. True world peace can happen only if God is in the center to really prove the most fundamental bond between us and the people in the world as brothers and sisters who have one same parent.

Ohnshim (18)

Jr. LTF USA member

I realized many points when we went to the village for the service project. One is that seeing each other as members of one global family is possible. We were immediately able to connect even though we met for the first time in our lives. I also realized that service really helps melt all the different cultural differences as long as we look at each other from God’s perspective.

Pilsung (14)

Jr. LTF USA member

Experiencing God through Mentoring

Experiencing God through Mentoring

CVA Principal Maruko Breland thanks volunteers for service to CVA students

The Core Values Academy is a weekly program that provides children age 4-16 a place to reinforce and develop values that they are cultivating in the family.

In ways, Core Values Academy resembles a family – mentors are like elder brothers and sister, and many teachers are parents of students. Every week mentors and teachers are taught valuable lessons on how to put values like “living for the sake of others into practice.”

“Being an older brother or sister is one of the greatest ways to come to understand and resemble God’s Heart,” CVA Principal Maruko Breland said at the opening of a teacher and mentor training program in Seattle, Washington. “God doesn’t just see a person where they’re at now. He’s sees where they came from and where they will get to.”

Teachers and mentors discussed their insights and experience, as volunteer teachers, developed their capacity through presentations on classroom management and professionalism, and wrote out class expectations.

Some mentors reflected on the challenges in the classroom. One mentor said he has learned the importance of embodying the values that they are teaching. Another jokingly said his patience has been stretched to a new capacity.

What lessons have you learned in your family relationships about God?